| Code: 91930 |

TIN news:   A network of variable speed limit signs has become active on three highways in British Columbia (BC), a province of Canada.
The pilot project of the BC government has been introduced to reduce the frequency and severity of weather-related crashes on highways 1, 5 and 99.
The province has installed 18 variable speed signs from Perry River to Revelstoke, 13 signs along the Coquihalla from Portia Interchange to the former Toll Plaza and 16 signs along the Sea to Sky from Squamish to Function Junction.
Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Todd Stone said: "It is important drivers understand that along these corridors, these signs aren't 'speed readers', they are the law.
"These electronic signs will adjust the speed limit according to conditions and will require drivers to slow down and reduce their speed in bad weather."
"It is important drivers understand that along these corridors, these signs aren't 'speed readers', they are the law."
To install the system, the ministry has invested $12.5m. These systems were largely made and manufactured in the province.
The pilot programme is part of the ministry's Road Safety Improvement Programme, which it intends to invest $25m in every year.
In extreme cold, freezing rain or heavy snowfall, an elaborate system of traffic, pavement and visibility sensors detect the conditions and provide a recommended speed to operations staff located in the Regional Traffic Management Centre in Coquitlam.
The recommended speed will be updated on digital signs, which will help drivers know a safe driving speed during adverse weather conditions.

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